Tuesday, August 20, 2019

hydrogen economy :: essays research papers

The first and foremost element on the periodic chart is well known throughout the world. It makes up the greater portion of the earths atmosphere. It was discovered by Cavendish in seventeen seventy-six. It all started with his discovery which has led to future events. I am referring to the substance we all know as hydrogen. In nineteen thirty-seven, the Germans had used hydrogen in the Hindenburg, which in turn after the disaster has scared many into thinking that hydrogen is a very dangerous substance. However, little radiant heat is emitted when hydrogen burns and will not cause danger to anyone unless they actually touch the fire, which is the reason why so many survived. In nineteen fifty-eight, when NASA was created, hydrogen was chosen to be the fuel for the rocket program. The choice of hydrogen was due to its clean emissions and the abundance of hydrogen on earth. The demand from NASA for hydrogen has inspired the question throughout the world; why not use hydrogen as an al ternative source of energy? As this question has remained in the minds of many, one such question was asked: Why not use hydrogen for the vehicles that we have become so dependent upon for transportation? The two thousand Olympics, which were held in Sydney, allowed the general public to see the advancement and the future potential of the hydrogen car which made a huge exposure throughout the world through mass media. If hydrogen became the number one fuel source for the automobiles of the future, the United States will be able to avoid oil spills, avoid harmful pollutants, and end the dependence on foreign sources for oil. However, many troubles arise in the area of using it as fuel for a car, being able to store it so it is safe for the everyday use and producing enough Hydrogen to make it economically efficient.

Monday, August 19, 2019

Fossil Fuels And Alternative Energy Sources :: essays research papers fc

“Shifting Power'; Since the beginning of industry humans have been in search of fuel to power machines and generate energy. Fossil fuels, such as crude oil and coal, discovered beneath the Earth’s surface were found to be an excellent source of fuel. These fossil fuels are burnt in order to generate the energy required to complete various tasks. However, we are now realizing the problems that are created by using fossil fuels to generate energy. These problems are so great that they will force humans to find an alternative source of energy in order to avoid the inevitable disasters that lie ahead. Every day millions of people drive their automobiles to work where they spend the day in a well lit workspace. Yet, they never give a second thought to the source of the energy that their daily lives depends on. Over eighty-five percent of the energy that powers the planet is derived from the burning of fossil fuels (Information 16). Fossil fuels contain impurities and these “impurities such as sulfur also burn and produce potentially dangerous oxides'; which are released into the air (Burning www 1). Releasing these oxides into the air has many consequences including smog, which is the most noticeable of these problems. The hazy smog that hangs over us in the summer is actually ground level ozone; the most harmful pollutant of our air (Information 59). Pollutants of the air we breathe are very dangerous and cause many problems especially to people with breathing disorders. For instance, the E.P.A. estimates that emissions of toxic material like these “oxides'; cause some 2000 cancer deaths a year (Information 61). The rainwater that falls through this polluted air also poses a major risk. Industrial plants and automobiles emit chemicals that mix with the moisture in the atmosphere and form acids that eventually fall to the Earth (Information 89). The same sulfur and nitrous oxides that cause the smog at ground level form nitric and sulfuric acids in the atmosphere (Burning www 1). Upon arrival to Earth this acidic rain damages everything that is falls on. The evidence of acid rain is extremely visible in the damaged forests, polluted soil, and the contaminated plants and animals that are spread around the globe. This acid rain is so damaging it is also blamed for destroying the ancient Greek structures that have previously remained intact (Burning www 2). To add to the list of health and environmental problems associated with the burning of fossil fuels, global warming is also a major threat.

Sunday, August 18, 2019

The Media During the Tiananmen Square Protests Essay -- China Chinese

The Media During the Tiananmen Square Protests There will always be talk about the biases of the media and the perspective in which it takes when reporting the news; however, when the news is run by the government and the people who write the news are threatened to withdraw from their positions because they will not write propaganda, it becomes a serious issue that can lead a country into turmoil. Such was the situation in Beijing, the capital of China, in 1989, during the student and worker protests at Tiananmen Square and the ultimate killings that occurred on June 4th of that year. The role of the Chinese government in the Tiananmen Square protests went far beyond their military control and suppression; the government’s role in banning publications and firing media personnel for standing up for themselves and the protestors resulted in skewed reporting and a void in which there would be reliable information about the event, such as the number of people that died, eyewitness accounts, etc. Most of the information that resulted from state-run agencies and media were largely propagandistic and more detrimental to the government than the protestors. Foreign correspondents were mostly chased off by officials who didn’t want the students telling their story outside of a government-controlled environment; however, one newspaper from Hong Kong, Ming Pao, was able to document the event with photographs, because of their ability to blend in with the crowd. Compared to the reports from People’s Daily, the compiled photographs taken by Ming Pao jou rnalists reveal the student point of view – and the history of Chinese political activism and nationalism. The Tiananmen Square protests stemmed from policies that were initiate... ...alists see themselves as civil servants, an editor at the English-language China Daily describes the situation more bluntly: "We are like dogs on a leash. A very short leash." Works Cited: Jernow, Allison Liu. â€Å"The Tight Leash Loosens.† Columbia Journalism Review January/February 1994 Mathews, Jay. â€Å"The Myth of Tiananmen.† Columbia Journalism Review September/October 1998 Ming Pao News. June Four: A Chronicle of the Chinese Democratic Uprising. Fayetteville: The University of Arkansas Press, 1989. (source of photos) Simmie, Scott and Bob Nixon. Tiananmen Square. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1989. Thom, Cathleen. â€Å"Invisible Censorship: The Freedom of the Press and Its Responsibility† The Humanist. July/August 1999 Yu, Mok Chiu and Frank J. Harrison. Voices From Tiananmen Square. Montreal-New York: Black Rose Books, 1990. The Media During the Tiananmen Square Protests Essay -- China Chinese The Media During the Tiananmen Square Protests There will always be talk about the biases of the media and the perspective in which it takes when reporting the news; however, when the news is run by the government and the people who write the news are threatened to withdraw from their positions because they will not write propaganda, it becomes a serious issue that can lead a country into turmoil. Such was the situation in Beijing, the capital of China, in 1989, during the student and worker protests at Tiananmen Square and the ultimate killings that occurred on June 4th of that year. The role of the Chinese government in the Tiananmen Square protests went far beyond their military control and suppression; the government’s role in banning publications and firing media personnel for standing up for themselves and the protestors resulted in skewed reporting and a void in which there would be reliable information about the event, such as the number of people that died, eyewitness accounts, etc. Most of the information that resulted from state-run agencies and media were largely propagandistic and more detrimental to the government than the protestors. Foreign correspondents were mostly chased off by officials who didn’t want the students telling their story outside of a government-controlled environment; however, one newspaper from Hong Kong, Ming Pao, was able to document the event with photographs, because of their ability to blend in with the crowd. Compared to the reports from People’s Daily, the compiled photographs taken by Ming Pao jou rnalists reveal the student point of view – and the history of Chinese political activism and nationalism. The Tiananmen Square protests stemmed from policies that were initiate... ...alists see themselves as civil servants, an editor at the English-language China Daily describes the situation more bluntly: "We are like dogs on a leash. A very short leash." Works Cited: Jernow, Allison Liu. â€Å"The Tight Leash Loosens.† Columbia Journalism Review January/February 1994 Mathews, Jay. â€Å"The Myth of Tiananmen.† Columbia Journalism Review September/October 1998 Ming Pao News. June Four: A Chronicle of the Chinese Democratic Uprising. Fayetteville: The University of Arkansas Press, 1989. (source of photos) Simmie, Scott and Bob Nixon. Tiananmen Square. Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1989. Thom, Cathleen. â€Å"Invisible Censorship: The Freedom of the Press and Its Responsibility† The Humanist. July/August 1999 Yu, Mok Chiu and Frank J. Harrison. Voices From Tiananmen Square. Montreal-New York: Black Rose Books, 1990.

Saturday, August 17, 2019

Sanchez and Levine Summary

In making the distinction between competency modeling (CM) and traditional Job analysis (TAXI the authors articulate that the latter encores itself with describing and measuring day-to-day operations of specific roles In an organization while the former relates to desired behavioral competencies that transcend various roles and In doing so contribute to an overarching organizational strategy. The authors compare CM and TAX along six dimensions: purpose, view of the job, focus, time orientation, performance level and measurement approach.While all dimensions are equally important in making a clear distinction between the two concepts, for the purpose of this summary I will be focusing on what is in my opinion he three most relevant distinctions between the two HRS methodologies namely, focus, time orientation and performance level. The authors argue that TAX focuses solely on the job and in doing so fails to recognize that job behavior could be influenced by factors other than formal responsibilities.CM on the other hand, builds itself around notions of 'employer brand' and 'employee value proposition' that include behavioral themes and unique performance characteristics that derive directly from the organizational identity itself. The focus of CM Is particularly important because it has significant practical implications when communicating management expectations to employees.An employer brand should identify with a business strategy and communicating strategic competencies as a component of management expectations is more likely to encourage on-brand behavior in the delivery of products and services to customers, regardless of the employee's Job title. For example, the inclusion of ‘Discretionary Effort' among Feeder's competencies encourages Its employees to go above and beyond their day-to-day Job responsibilities and provide creative solutions to customers' demands, which Is consistent with an overarching business strategy of exceeding customer expect ations.Furthermore, since competencies communicate universal behavioral themes that the organization wishes to see across all Jobs, employees seeking career advancement are able to identify with these themes and perform their duties that not only benefit themselves but the organization as well. Most organizations do not engage their employees In a manner that encourages them to demonstrate such on-brand behavior.However It seems quite clear, that accompanying specific job duties with these behavioral themes and rewarding employees for demonstrating such behaviors in the workplace could have a significant impact on a firm's reputation and overall consistency in the manner employees perform their duties. Secondly, the authors argue that TAX Is rooted In the past because It concerns itself with describing a Job by relying on those who have performed the Job till date.In contrast CM NAS a Touch on ten Torture, Decease It communicates now a Joy snouts be interpreted and performed from no w on regardless of past behavior. TAX takes a bottom-up approach relying on information obtained from employees performing the job, while CM takes a top-down approach by communicating generic behavioral themes identified by leaders who are also responsible for strategic planning.Furthermore, the authors interject that TAX outlines day-to-day operational capabilities that have facilitated the survival of the organization till date, while CM concerns itself with change-oriented competencies that encourage employees to demonstrate certain behavioral characteristics that may facilitate growth and hang. In essence, CM allows employees to better understand how their specific Job assignments contribute to the organization's strategic initiatives and when provided with the right incentives, employees are more likely to change their behaviors that align with these strategies going in to the future.Providing employees with a sense of purpose and direction that facilitates the firm's future gr owth is more likely to encourage behaviors that go above and beyond an employee's basic duties in serving the customers which may in turn serve the organization as well. Last but not the least, the distinct performance level addressed by TAX and CM is of particular significance because it allows us to understand what will bring out the best from employees in an organization.While TAX addresses the typical' requirements needed to perform the work assignments, CM focuses on ‘maximal' performance by encouraging a series of loosely coupled behavioral themes that go beyond the operational efficiency of basic aspects of a Job. This distinction is significant because if managers wish to encourage employees to perform at a level hat goes beyond the typical day-to-day responsibilities, they must excel at implicitly communicating these behavioral themes to others in the organization.These themes tend to be generic so they transcend across all Job titles within the organization and bear on the interpersonal aspects of the manner in which the Job ought to be performed. Therefore, as mentioned earlier, those seeking career advancement have a clear idea of what sort of behavior will result in favorable outcomes and that optimizing day-to-day operations alone will not serve them or the organization in the long run.

Friday, August 16, 2019

Joy of Life

JOY OF LIFE My dear friends, Everybody wants to live long and stay fit. I have 8 point formula to stay fit and enjoy life†¦.. 1. Forget : Forget about your age, weight and height. Say bye bye to all tined and processed food. Always eat natural and fresh vegetables and fruits. 2. Keep cheerful friends and relatives : Always choose good jolly good friends and enjoy your relationship with good relatives. This will keep you always happy. Laugh with your friends and relatives as and when you have time to celebrate the joy of life. . Always learn something : Always educate yourself till the end of you life. Continue learning is very good and it keeps you busy all the time. You can learn computer, Crafts, Gardening, book writing, language learning and there is no end of learning. 4. Simple living and high thinking : Make your life simple, don’t involve you life in complicated things. Live simple life, Eat simple food, Enjoy simple things in your life. Simplicity is the best in a ll manner.Thank God that you are alive. 6. Keep yourself busy with you hobbies. : Keep yourself busy with your hobbies, music, plants, filing, writing and whatever keeps you busy otherwise you know â€Å"Empty mind is Devil’s workshop†. 7. Take a break : If you feel alone and want to enjoy something else, take a break and visit to your favorite place, mall, garden, picnic spot, riverside, hill station, Temple, church any place where you feel peace of mind. Go for a meditation camp or a yoga camp.Learn how to love peacefully and energetic. 8. Let people aware that you love them, and Always remember : That our live is not measured by age, breaths we take, height etc. It is measured by how you love and enjoy your live. So friends, if you like it please forward it to your friends and relative so that they can share it with someone and enjoy the life at the fullest†¦ You know Life is a gift from God to love and the greatest thing in the world is love†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦

Vietnam War Outcome Influenced by the Media

Term 3 Paper: The Media and Vietnam War The Vietnam War was a war of mass destruction, leaving Vietnam to become bitterly divided and claiming the many lives of Vietnamese civilians as well as American soldiers. Out of all the wars in American history, the Vietnam War was the first war to be broadly televised and covered by the media. It came to be known as the first â€Å"Television War†. Journalists began to pour into Vietnam from all over the nation, to cover the lives of the American Soldiers as well as Vietnamese civilians.As television brought horrendous images of the war into American living rooms, the perception of an American solider as a hero slowly became the image of the American enemy. Thus, the media is a major factor that resulted to the Vietnamization of the conflict, following the end of the war during the fall of Saigon. Television was the main source of news for the American public, and perhaps the most influence on the public opinion of the war. A study sho wed that â€Å"In 1950, only nine percent of homes owned a television. By 1966, this rose to ninety-three percent. (McLaughlin). As television popularity rose, Americans began to depend of television as an accurate source of how they understood the war. In addition, no censorship was established to limit the amount of information being put out to the American public. In the website article, Vietnam: A Censored War, John a. Cloud states â€Å"the fact that there was no military censorship, there was still censorship among the government† (Cloud). Due to lack of censorship, journalists could follow the military into combat and report their observations without formal censorship.Therefore, journalists that experienced the violent combat were able to present the public with more graphic images that the nation has ever seen. One of the most influential journalists was Walter Cronkite, â€Å"Cronkite turned against the war and called for peace negotiations. † (NPR). As an a nchor for â€Å"CBS Evening News†, Cronkite made his statement against the war. This influenced all other journalists to follow his lead. As a result, journalists reported the actions of the soldiers negatively. Gradually, Support for the war began to decrease by the fall of 1967.One of the most turning events of the Vietnam War was the Tet Offensive in 1968. During the Tet Offensive, the media presented images of soldiers sweeping through over one-hundred southern Vietnamese cities. After the televised coverage of the Battle of Tet, majority Americans withdrew their support for the war. In the book Eyewitness Vietnam War, Admiral Grant Sharp argued â€Å"the reality of the 1968 Tet Offensive was that Hanoi had taken a big gamble and lost on the battlefield, but they won a solid physiological victory in the United States. † (Murray 18).This proves that, the media was creating false claims to provoke the people into pushing the government to stop the war. The media also portrayed the attack as a defeat for the United States, â€Å"the media, not the military confirmed the growing perception that the U. S was unable to with the war. † (McLaughlin). With this advantage, the north Viet Cong was using the media to win the sympathy of the American public, so that they would turn against their government. The anti-war movement by 1965 influenced many Americans to oppose their government’s involvement in the war.Thus, â€Å"†¦ after the Tet offensive, the number of protesters skyrocketed† (Langer 235). One example is the Kent State Massacre, which led to the death of four students. There was a significant national response to the shooting, such as the closing of schools thought the United States due to student strikes. However, the most damaging event for a U. S soldier’s reputation was the massacre of My Lai, â€Å"images of dead children, women, and families flooded newspapers and television. † (Murray 23). When the incident became public, it promoted the widespread outrage thought the world.The American solider was now portrayed as â€Å"monstrous killers with no qualms about killing Vietnamese civilians. † (Cloud). Critics of the war created accusations towards the soldiers such as: drug use, rape, and barbaric acts. This led the people to question the purpose of America’s involvement of the war. The media was also used to expose government information regarding the Vietnam War. There was a conspiracy that, an alleged attack on the U. S spy ship (USS Maddox) was purposely created to become the pretext for war in Vietnam. Also known as the â€Å"Gulf of Tonkin†, the event granted congress permission to invade Vietnam.American journalist, Nigel Sheehan exposed the documents that told the truth about the start of the war. As a  reporter  for  The New York Times,  Ã¢â‚¬Å"in 1971, Sheehan obtained the classified  Pentagon Papers  from  Daniel Ellsberg. † (Shah). Sheehan collaborated with Ellsberg (a former pentagon staff) to publish the series of articles that contained the history of the U. S involvement in the war. The official secret history of the war would reveal that â€Å"administration officials had drafted the gulf of Tonkin resolution themselves, two months before the attack of Maddox. †(Shah).This caused the people to become outraged, censuring the government for the start of the war instead of the Viet Cong. An article from Media Beat in 1994, explains that the â€Å"heavy reliance on U. S government officials as sources of information and reluctance to question official statements on national security issues, led to a lot of inaccurate media reporting† (Langer 256). Many stories about atrocities of the war were witnessed, but were initially never reported. Even if atrocities were reported, they were perceived as a tragedy because the government did not want to take the blame.For example, when the My Lai Massacre was reported on the â€Å"Newsweek† the banner headline was â€Å"An American Tragedy† (Murray). This caused sympathy for the invader and deflected from the truth about the atrocities. Above all, the atrocities were in fact, a Vietnamese tragedy. With the influence of media, the Americans failed to have public support for the war to carry on. Moreover, tensions between the news media and the Nixon administration only increased as the war dragged on. Finally, Nixon was pressured to find a resolution to end the war.As a result, on November 3, 1969, President  Richard M. Nixon  made a televised speech laying out his policy toward Vietnam, â€Å"promising to continue to support the South Vietnamese government and held out a plan for the withdrawal of American combat troops. † (Wyatt). With this he created Vietnamization to slowly withdraw troops out of Vietnam, along with plans to end the war. In brief, the media was a major factor that motivated the Am erican public to pressure the government to stop involvement of the war. As a result, the media is one of the factors that resulted in America’s cost of the war.Works cited Cloud, John A. â€Å"Vietnam: A Censored War. † Thecrimson. com. The Harvard Crimson, 9 Mar. 1991. Web. Considered, All Things. â€Å"Cronkite on Vietnam War : NPR. † NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts : NPR. Web. 17 Feb. 2012. . Langer, Howard. The Vietnam War: An Encyclopedia of Quotations / Howard J. Langer. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2005.Print. McLaughlin, Erin. â€Å"The Media and the Vietnam War. † The Warbird's Forum: AVG Flying Tigers, Brewster Buffaloes, Flying Wings, Japan at War, Vietnam, and Other Military History Stuff. Web. 17 Feb. 2012. ;http://www. warbirdforum. com/media. htm;. Murray, Stuart. Eyewitness Vietnam War. NY: DK Pub. , 2005. Print. Shah, Anup. â€Å"Media, Propaganda and Vietnam — Global Issues. † Global Iss ues : Social, Political, Economic and Environmental Issues That Affect Us All — Global Issues. 24 Oct. 2003. Web. 17 Feb. 2012. ;http://www. globalissues. rg/article/402/media-propaganda-and-vietnam;. Cloud, John A. â€Å"Vietnam: A Censored War. † Thecrimson. com. The Harvard Crimson, 9 Mar. 1991. Web. ;http://www. thecrimson. com/article/1991/3/9/vietnam-a-censored-war-pbybou-cant/; Considered, All Things. â€Å"Cronkite on Vietnam War : NPR. † NPR : National Public Radio : News ; Analysis, World, US, Music ; Arts : NPR. Web. 17 Feb. 2012. ;http://www. npr. org/templates/story/story. php? storyId=1147965;. Langer, Howard. The Vietnam War: An Encyclopedia of Quotations / Howard J. Langer.Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2005. Print. McLaughlin, Erin. â€Å"The Media and the Vietnam War. † The Warbird's Forum: AVG Flying Tigers, Brewster Buffaloes, Flying Wings, Japan at War, Vietnam, and Other Military History Stuff. Web. 17 Feb. 2012. . Murray, Stuart. Eyewitne ss Vietnam War. NY: DK Pub. , 2005. Print. Shah, Anup. â€Å"Media, Propaganda and Vietnam — Global Issues. † Global Issues : Social, Political, Economic and Environmental Issues That Affect Us All — Global Issues. 24 Oct. 2003. Web. 17 Feb. 2012.

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Discounting & Augmentation Principle

We use attribution in a regular basis, whenever we are asked to give the cause of a behavior or decision we make us of attribution. Attribution refers to the act of assigning or attributing a certain cause to an achievement or accomplishment (Feick & Rhodewalt, 1997). Such that when we are asked to comment on how we were able to ace the exam, we might attribute it to our personal efforts and abilities or to mere luck.The principles of discounting and augmentation refer to the manner in which we use attribution. Discounting occurs when we try to discount personal ability in favor of external factors, like when we say that the exam was easy when half of the class got a hundred percent correct score. In this example, we discount personal abilities and augment the effect of environmental factors which is the level of difficulty of the test.On the other hand, when one or two students had perfect scores in the test, then we would be quick to point out that the said students are really good in class which reflects the augmentation principle; we augment the personal abilities of the students. If someone was to comment that the exam was easy, then we would discount the argument based on the fact that only a few students had perfect scores in the test. Discounting and augmentation is said to be dependent on the circumstances in which the behavior or judgment occurs (Feick & Rhodewalt, 1997).For example, when a child fights with another child, he/she may attribute the fight to the other child’s behavior which is augmenting the personal characteristics of the other child. On the other hand, the child rarely says that the fight was brought about by environmental factors like the weather, peer pressure or the child’s own decision to fight which also reflects the discounting principle. Therefore, it would be safe to assume that discounting and augmentation occurs in tandem.